The “internet imaginaire”

Is there a coherent ideology at the core of Silicon Valley? Adam Greenfield responds (7 July 2017, via @JanetGunter; see also Meredith Broussard on the history of MIT)

Has the game changed? [2]

This year I have finally joined the world of video streaming. I am still only exploring different service providers, and I haven’t completely abandoned traditional TV, but it has been an interesting few months nevertheless, personally and professionally.

Here are a couple of items that resonate with my own observations.

Terms and conditions apply.

I have recently come across, with only a day apart, two brilliant phrases: “monochrome diversity” and “multi-coloured conformity“.

There indeed are so many ‘fine prints’ when we discuss diversity and inclusion. The silver lining is that we see many pithy attempts to call them out. “오빠가 허락한 페미니즘” is another fascinating one. This controversy surrounding Olafur Eliasson’s ongoing exhibition, In Real Life, at Tate Modern is an embarrassing case in point that artists and museums “only produce, curate, exhibit art for certain bodies“, even for an exhibition that claims to be about agency and co-creation.

And the illustration below.

((c) 2015-2019 kevinbolk, original here)

Computer says so. [2]

Couldn’t get this out of my head either. Also remembered this clip where a 72-year-old vlogger, Korea Grandma, was grappling with a self-service kiosk at a McDonald’s.

RT @AskAKorean This image haunted me for this seollal. On the crowded LNY trains, all the old people are in the standing seats because they can’t figure out how to book tickets online […] (5 February 2019)

LNY is a big holiday, so lots of Koreans travel home. Train tix for LNY sells out within minutes of being available for sale. And most of them are snapped up online. If you don’t know how to book tickets online, like many old people are, you are often out of luck.

The article describes old folks who show up to the train station hours early just so they can have a shot at buying train tickets. When they’re lucky enough to do so, they are often relegated to standing tickets. Hence, the messed up trains where only the old people stand.

S Korea is the most wired society in the world, and it often decides to simply let people who can’t keep up stay behind and suffer. I hate seeing this type of scene happening again and again.

Happy Korean New Year [3]

Had a shaky start to 2019. Was down with the flu early January and I was out of commission for a week. It was a record in a sense. In the past, even when I was unwell, I didn’t usually take more than one day off, and I would still check my work inbox occasionally throughout that day. This time I was barely able to sit up, let alone move around, for one whole week. So I ended up doing nothing but drinking lots of tea and water while watching, in a half-asleep state, the full series of Parks and Recreation for the first time. The lesson of all this might have been that I am no longer that youthful version of me.

Anyhoo, because of this ordeal, I didn’t get to make any New Year’s resolutions. However, a good thing about being from a lunar calendar culture is that there is a second chance!

Well, actually, my resolutions are always the same: less sugar, less screen time on commute, and sleep earlier. Always these same ones, always failing to keep them, and always rolling them over to the next year. As a desperate measure, I have turned to audiobooks — something I would never have imagined myself doing. I don’t even like ebooks that much, so this is a pretty big leap for me. I am pleasantly surprised so far with this new commuting experience — but don’t confuse my new found love for audiobooks with how I feel about commuting.

Most importantly, happy Korean New Year!